Plant Water Transport – Lesson Plan

25 de agosto de 2014AHOY

Undoubtedly, rather breath-taking paintings can be created in ink. Yet, the picture that appears on the leaves of a white carnation as a result of an intriguing experiment certainly competes with those paintings. What does the vascular tissue consist of? What do the terms "xylem" and "phloem" stand for? What do they look like? What are vascular bundles and what types do they have? How can they be examined? The following lesson plan provides ideas for teaching plant water transport.

1. Let's introduce the parts of the vascular tissue and the basic idea behind their operation. 

Tracheophyta both transport water and water solutes in tubular formations. The vascular tissue can be divided into two parts, namely the xylem and the phloem. While the xylem transmits such ions that become dissolved in it, from its root towards all the other organs, the phloem transmits organic materials having been dissolved in water from the leaves towards all the other organs.

2. Let’s introduce histological sections that help students understand the following processes, using mozaTools Microscope tool:

Elements of the xylem, the so-called water carrying pipes are nothing else but dead cells. During their individual development, they lose their cytoplasm as well as their nucleus. Then, cell walls that follow each other melt into pipes. In the process, solidifying materials will be built in its wall. Thus, walls of pipes become thicker but also narrower. Additionally, they also play a pivotal role in the solidification of the plant body.

Now let’s open the following segments in MozaTools Micropscope tool that is available in „Contents” menu:

  • Plant vascular bundle cross section in dycotyledon stem (Buttercop stem, stained with Congo red and chrysoidine)
  • Plant vascular bundle cross section in monocotyledon stem (Asparegus stem, stained with Congo red and chrysoidine)
  • Plant vascular bundle cross section in monocotyledon stem (Corn stem, stained with Congo red and chrysoidine)
  • Plant vascular tissue (gourd stem)
  • Section of a leaf blade

 

By using the magnifier and the cursor, certain parts of the picture can be brilliantly displayed.

Now let’s track water's path in a white carnation by watching a short film about it.

To conclude, ink was uplifted by parechima cells, by water conducting cells and by water carrying pipes. The propulsion is on the one hand physical: capillary forces, on the other hand biological: „root pressure” (active transport), evaporation.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Methodological Assistance

Subject: Biology

Material: Plant tissues/water absorption and water transportation in plants

Age Group: Secondary Grammar School, students 15-16 years of age

Skills: experimenting with chemicals, using a microscope

MozaLearn Tools used:

  • mozaBook: Science for Teenagers
  • mozaTools: Microscope
     

The goal of the lesson is to acquire knowledge of the following processes and connections and also understanding them:

  • Water absorption and water transportation in plants is both a physical and a biological process.
  • The vascular tissue can be divided into two parts, namely the xylem and phloem.
  • The xylem transmits ions that become dissolved in it from its root towards all the other organs.
  • The phloem transmits organic materials having been dissolved in water from the leaves, towards all the other organs.
Tags: water transportation , xylem , phloem , lesson plan
Added to your cart.