Passive house

Passive house

In a passive house a comfortable inner temperature can be ensured without the use of traditional heating and cooling systems.

Geography

Keywords

passive house, energy saving, environmental protection, dwelling, house, insulation, shielding, heat exchanger, ventilation system, energy, geography

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Scenes

  • - The ventilation system ensures the flow of fresh air from outside and the extraction of stale air from interior spaces. In winter, the heat recovery system minimizes heat loss.

  • - The ventilation system ensures the flow of fresh air from outside and the extraction of stale air from interior spaces. In winter, the heat recovery system minimizes heat loss.

Narration

Passive houses are energy efficient buildings, which ensure a pleasant indoor climate without requiring a conventional heating or cooling system. This is due to efficient insulation and a heat recovery ventilation system.

The insulation covers the entire building envelope, including the foundation. Heating is supplied by passive heat sources, such as the body heat of the occupants, the heat generated by appliances and the sunlight entering through triple-glazed windows.

Ventilation is provided by a heat recovery ventilator. In winter, the incoming cold air flows through underground pipes and takes on the temperature of the ground. This preheated air enters the heat exchanger.

The extracted air from the house also enters the heat exchanger, transferring part of its heat to the incoming fresh air. Thus, the outgoing air is cooled, while the incoming air is heated. The stale air and fresh air do not mix, only heat exchange occurs.

In the house, the incoming air is further heated due to the passive heat sources and it is eventually removed from the house through an exhaust system. Additional heating may be required, but only on the coldest winter days. In summer, the warm incoming air is cooled in the ground before entering the building.

In this case, the incoming air goes around the heat exchanger through a bypass system, so no heat exchange occurs.

The first passive house was built in Darmstadt, Germany, in 1990. Today, this technology is becoming increasingly popular worldwide.

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