How does it work - Refrigerator

How does it work - Refrigerator

This animation demonstrates how a refrigerator works.

Technology

Keywords

refrigerator, fridge, household appliance, cooling, heat reduction, heat release, compressor, condenser, refrigerant, electric, thermodynamics, technology, physics

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Scenes

  • - While the hot vapor flows through this, it releases heat into the environment and condenses.
  • - It compresses warm vapor flowing out of the food compartment, making it hot and therefore releasing heat while flowing into the condenser.
  • - It reduces the previously high-pressure of the warm liquid, therefore some of the liquid evaporates and it cools down. The resulting cold vapor-liquid mixture flows in to the evaporator inside the food compartment.

  • - A mixture of cold vapor and liquid, cooling the refrigerator compartment.

  • warm vapor - The warm and vaporized refrigerant leaving the refrigerator compartment.
  • hot vapor - It compresses the warm vapor flowing out of the evaporator inside the refrigerator compartment. This causes it to warm up and therefore release heat while flowing into the condenser.

  • - While the hot vapor flows through this, it releases heat into the environment and condenses.
  • - It compresses warm vapor flowing out of the food compartment, making it hot and therefore releasing heat while flowing into the condenser.
  • - It reduces the previously high-pressure of the warm liquid, therefore some of the liquid evaporates and it cools down. The resulting cold vapor-liquid mixture flows in to the evaporator inside the food compartment.
  • hot vapor
  • - The cold vapor-liquid mixture leaving the expansion valve which cools the refrigerator compartment
  • warm vapor
  • warm vapor - The warm and vaporized refrigerant leaving the refrigerator compartment.
  • hot vapor - It compresses the warm vapor flowing out of the evaporator inside the refrigerator compartment. This causes it to warm up and therefore release heat while flowing into the condenser.

  • - While the hot vapor flows through this, it releases heat into the environment and condenses.
  • - It compresses warm vapor flowing out of the food compartment, making it hot and therefore releasing heat while flowing into the condenser.
  • - It reduces the previously high-pressure of the warm liquid, therefore some of the liquid evaporates and it cools down. The resulting cold vapor-liquid mixture flows in to the evaporator inside the food compartment.
  • hot vapor
  • - The cold vapor-liquid mixture leaving the expansion valve which cools the refrigerator compartment
  • warm vapor

Narration

While a refrigerator cools down food stored inside, it draws heat away from the food compartment and releases it outside. Let's follow the phases of this process starting in the food compartment.

The refrigerant - a mixture of cold vapor and liquid- flows into the evaporator pipe system. Due to the difference in temperatures, the refrigerant draws heat away from the food compartment. The refrigerant becomes hot and fully evaporates, which draws away more heat.

The warm vapor from the food compartment flows into the compressor, which compresses it and causes its pressure and temperature to rise.

The resulting vapor is conducted into the condenser, where the difference in temperature of the vapor and its environment causes the vapor to release heat.

The vapor flowing in the pipe condenses, it turns into liquid. This partly cooled, warm liquid then enters the expansion valve. Here it collects and therefore the pressure in the incoming pipe is high, while the pressure in the outgoing pipe is low. The pressure drops suddenly and therefore the vapor partly evaporates and cools down.

The resulting mixture of cold vapor and liquid is conducted back into the evaporator.

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