Connective tissues

Connective tissues

Connective tissues include loose and dense connective tissues, adipose tissue, blood, tendon and bone tissue.

Biology

Keywords

connective tissue, supportive connective tissue, blood tissue, cartilaginous tissue, bone tissue, blood, tendon, white adipose tissue, dense connective tissue, loose, bone, tissue, hyaline cartilage, extracellular matrix, skeleton, fat, cartilage, collagen fibre, elastic fibre, mastocyte, fat cells, white blood cell, red blood cell, platelet, osteon, human, biology

Related items

Scenes

  • collagen fiber - Strong, less elastic connective tissue fibers composed of collagen protein.
  • elastic fiber - Elastic connective tissue fibers: they can stretch up to 1.5 times their length, and snap back to their original length when relaxed. They are composed of elastin protein.
  • - They synthesize coagulants (heparin) and substances that trigger the inflammatory response (serotonin, histamine).
  • - They synthesize connective tissue fibers.

  • fibers - The main mass of the tissue is provided by bundles of very strong collagen fibers.

  • reticular fiber - Connective tissue fibers forming a network.

  • - They are responsible for the transport of oxygen by hemoglobin. They do not have nuclei.

  • - A solid matrix containing fibers.

  • - It contains blood vessels and nerves, therefore causing great pain when damaged. In case of injury of the bone, it synthesizes bone tissue.

  • collagen fiber - Strong, less elastic connective tissue fibers composed of collagen protein.
  • elastic fiber - Elastic connective tissue fibers: they can stretch up to 1.5 times their length, and snap back to their original length when relaxed. They are composed of elastin protein.
  • - They synthesize coagulants (heparin) and substances that trigger the inflammatory response (serotonin, histamine).
  • - They synthesize connective tissue fibers.
  • reticular fiber - Connective tissue fibers forming a network.
  • - It contains blood vessels and nerves, therefore causing great pain when damaged. In case of injury of the bone, it synthesizes bone tissue.
  • fibers - The main mass of the tissue is provided by bundles of very strong collagen fibers.
  • - A solid matrix containing fibers.
  • - They are responsible for the transport of oxygen by hemoglobin. They do not have nuclei.

Narration

The cells in loose connective tissue are varied: they include phagocytes, which are important in immune defense, mastocytes, and fibroblasts, which produce fibers. The extracellular matrix contains collagen fibers, elastic fibers and blood vessels. The function of loose connective tissue in our bodies is to fill in gaps, form membranes, separate organs or hold them in place, or attach tissues to one another.

The cells that make up the white adipose tissue are spherical and contain a droplet of fat, which pushes the nucleus against the cell membrane. The intercellular space contains blood vessels and connective tissue fibers called reticular fibers. Fats are rich in energy; thus, one of the main functions of adipose tissue is to store nutrients. It also plays an important role in heat insulation, mechanical protection and the storage of the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K.

Bone tissue is a type of supportive connective tissue. Its solid intracellular matrix stores a great amount of calcium phosphate and calcium carbonate, which makes bones hard.
Bones are composed of an outer compact bone cortex and an internal spongy substance. Haversian canals and Volkmann's canals are located within the compact bone and have blood vessels running inside them. The cylindrical osteon is the fundamental unit of compact bone tissue. The concentric lamellae of osteons surround the Haversian canals. The lamellae are composed of the bone matrix with the bone cells between them. Bone cells have projections. The internal spongy bone consists of trabeculae, which have the ability to dynamically rearrange themselves according to the direction of load. Bone tissue makes up the hard internal skeleton of vertebrates (except that of cartilaginous fishes).

The tendon is a type of dense connective tissue. Connective tissue fibers are arranged in tendons that are bundled in parallel, with oblate tendon cells in between. Fibers are composed of collagen protein, which has a high tensile strength: tendon tissue of one square centimeter (0.155 sq in) in diameter can hold several hundreds of kilograms of load. This makes tendons very durable. Since this type of tissue has a very low blood supply, injured tendons tend to heal slowly. Tendons attach muscles to bones; therefore, this tissue plays an indispensable role in the locomotor system.

Cartilaginous tissue is a type of supportive connective tissue. Its intracellular matrix is solid and rich in fibers. There are several sub-types, which include collagen fiber cartilage, found in intervertebral disks; elastic fiber cartilage, found in the auricle; and hyalinous cartilage. Hyalinous cartilage is found in human joints and the internal skeleton of cartilaginous fishes. Its cells are typically spherical and are arranged in small clusters.

Blood tissue is a special type of connective tissue, since its intracellular matrix does not contain fibers. This matrix is called blood plasma; it is composed of water, proteins and minerals. The cellular components of the blood, that is, the red blood cells, the white blood cells and the platelets, are found in the plasma.
Red blood cells are donut-shaped, and they do not have nuclei. Their function is to transport oxygen. White blood cells are responsible for immune defense, while platelets play an important role in blood coagulation.

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