Aeolian landforms on coasts and steppes

Aeolian landforms on coasts and steppes

Wind, as an external force, plays an important role in shaping coastal areas and steppes.

Geography

Keywords

terrain shaping, wind, sand, deflation, steppe, oasis, sea shore, erosion, vegetation, sand dune, dune, surface, landform, external forces, sea, destruction, shaping, physical geography, geomorphology, geography

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Aeolian processes depend on certain conditions related to climate, vegetation and geology. Wind shapes the Earth’s surface most effectively in arid regions where there is sparse vegetation and a surface covered with grains of sediment. Such regions include areas partly anchored by vegetation as well as arid, semi-arid, glacial and coastal areas.

Wind, even if it reaches a high speed, can transport only small grains of sand that are no more than 2 mm (0.1 in) in diameter. Larger particles are transported along the surface through creeping, the smaller ones through saltation (bouncing, hopping along the ground, and the smallest ones suspeded in the air.

Most particles are transported through saltation which does not lift them higher than 10 cm (3.9 in).

Wind performs erosive and constructive action in areas partly anchored by vegetation, that is steppes, oases and coasts. Wind can transport the dry sand only from barren parts of these areas, where there is no vegetation. Deflation takes place when the wind removes sand particles from the ground, resulting in smaller troughs or larger blowouts (or deflation basins). Remnant ridges of the original surface that are composed of harder rock or covered with vegetation are called yardangs.

Once the wind dies down, it deposits the sediment it was carrying, creating various landforms. This process is called aeolian accumulation. U-shaped parabolic dunes form behind the blowouts.

Along coasts, the wind accumulates sediment deposited by the sea parallel to the coast. Several rows of dunes can form this way, and part of the sand of these dunes is anchored by vegetation.

Often vegetation is planted along coasts an in steppes to protect against erosion.

  • - Particles smaller than 0.08 mm (0.003 in) are transported by the wind this way: they are airborne.
  • 10 cm (3.9 in)

  • - U-shaped dune with elongated arms. Its concave side is facing the direction of the prevailing wind. This 2-20 m (6.56-65.6 ft) high dune forms behind depressions.

  • - A dune with a height of tens of meters parallel to the coast. It advances slowly towards the direction of the wind.
  • - U-shaped dune with elongated arms. Its concave side is facing the direction of the prevailing wind. This 2-20 m (6.56-65.6 ft) high dune forms behind depressions.

Narration

Aeolian processes depend on certain conditions related to climate, vegetation and geology. Wind shapes the Earth’s surface most effectively in arid regions where there is sparse vegetation and a surface covered with grains of sediment. Such regions include areas partly anchored by vegetation as well as arid, semi-arid, glacial and coastal areas.

Wind, even if it reaches a high speed, can transport only small grains of sand that are no more than 2 mm (0.1 in) in diameter. Larger particles are transported along the surface through creeping, the smaller ones through saltation (bouncing, hopping along the ground, and the smallest ones suspeded in the air.

Most particles are transported through saltation which does not lift them higher than 10 cm (3.9 in).

Wind performs erosive and constructive action in areas partly anchored by vegetation, that is steppes, oases and coasts. Wind can transport the dry sand only from barren parts of these areas, where there is no vegetation. Deflation takes place when the wind removes sand particles from the ground, resulting in smaller troughs or larger blowouts (or deflation basins). Remnant ridges of the original surface that are composed of harder rock or covered with vegetation are called yardangs.

Once the wind dies down, it deposits the sediment it was carrying, creating various landforms. This process is called aeolian accumulation. U-shaped parabolic dunes form behind the blowouts.

Along coasts, the wind accumulates sediment deposited by the sea parallel to the coast. Several rows of dunes can form this way, and part of the sand of these dunes is anchored by vegetation.

Often vegetation is planted along coasts an in steppes to protect against erosion.

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