Battleship (HMS Dreadnought, 1906)

Battleship (HMS Dreadnought, 1906)

HMS Dreadnought revolutionised battleship-building in the 20th century.

Technology

Keywords

battleship, Dreadnought, water transport, shipping, navy, artillery tower, volley fire, battle, cannon, torpedo tube, deck, stern, lifeboat, anchor, foremast, mizzen mast, rudder, propeller, maritime nation, fleet, transportation, technology

Related items

Scenes

Dreadnought battleship

The HMS Dreadnought

Dreadnought, i.e. ´fear nothing´ was the pride of the Royal Navy. Built at the Royal Portsmouth Dockyard in one year, the battleship revolutionised naval warfare and became the model for subsequent battleship designs, referred to as dreadnoughts.

Dreadnought was launched and put into service in 1906, but it did not play a significant role in World War I. It was withdrawn from service in 1919 and scrapped in 1923.

HMS Dreadnought

Top view

Construction

The slim and elliptical shape ensured speed. The battleship was also equipped with powerful artillery and thick armour. It was 160 m long and 25 m wide with a draught of 8 m. Its power was provided by a steam turbine powered by 18 Babcock & Wilcox boilers.

Since the old-fashioned steam engines with pistons were replaced by turbines, the hull of ships became less high, presenting a smaller target to enemy ships. A mast for radio transmission, two huge funnels and the first superstructure rose above the surface of the hull. The gun turrets were placed in such a way as to enable firing in all directions. Of course, the crew of 700 also had to prepare for emergencies, so lifeboats were placed on the deck.

Armament

The armament

The gem of the British Navy combined the state-of-the-art military technological achievements of its day, thus outstripping former battleships. An indication in this respect is the fact that former battleships are referred to as pre-dreadnoughts.

One of the most important innovations of the ship was the very powerful artillery. The formerly customary four heavy cannons were replaced by 10 large (305 mm) and 27 small (76 mm) cannons. Besides, the ship was also equipped with 5 torpedo tubes (450 mm). The heavy cannons were mounted on 5 separate towers.

A 100-280 mm thick armoured belt protected the hull of the ship, the deck´s armour was 75 mm thick, while the turrets and the tower were protected by a 280 mm thick armour. Although HMS Dreadnought was designed to deter the Germans, the ship only managed to intensify the already existing naval arms race.

Deck

On the deck of the battleship

HMS Dreadnought was controlled from the superstructure in front of the first funnel. It housed the captain´s bridge and the radio room. To provide a perfect firing position both vertically and horizontally, the cannon barrels were placed on a swivel base (tower). The armament, as well as the speed and the combat range were the key features of the battleship. The maximum speed was 39 km/h, i.e. 21 knots. Her combat range was 12,260 km at a speed of 19 km/h, or 10 knots, and 9,090 km at a speed of 34 km/h, or 18 knots.

Volley-firing

Construction

  • stern
  • lifeboat
  • bridge
  • anchors
  • gun turret
  • 305 mm cannon
  • first mast
  • rear mast
  • funnel
  • rudder
  • propellers
  • radio aerial

Animation

Operation of torpedo net

  • torpedo net

Narration

HMS Dreadnought, i.e. ´fear nothing´, was the pride of the Royal Navy. Built at the Royal Portsmouth Dockyard in one year, this battleship revolutionised naval warfare and became the model for subsequent battleship designs, referred to as dreadnoughts.

The gem of the British Navy combined the state-of-the-art military technological achievements of its day, thus outstripping former battleships. An indication in this respect is the fact that former battleships are referred to as pre-dreadnoughts. The slim and elliptical shape ensured speed. The battleship was also equipped with powerful artillery and thick armour.

It was 160 m long and 25 m wide with a draught of 8 m.
Its power was provided by a steam turbine powered by 18 Babcock & Wilcox boilers. Since the old-fashioned steam engines with pistons were replaced by turbines, the hull of ships became less high, presenting a smaller target to enemy ships. The maximum speed was 39 km/h, i.e. 21 knots. Her combat range was 12,260 km at a speed of 19 km/h, or 10 knots, and 9,090 km at a speed of 34 km/h, or 18 knots.

A mast for radio transmission, two huge funnels and the first superstructure rose above the surface of the hull. One of the most important innovations of the ship was the very powerful artillery. The gun turrets were placed in such a way as to enable firing in all directions. Of course, the crew of 700 also had to prepare for emergencies, so lifeboats were placed on the deck.
HMS Dreadnought was controlled from the superstructure in front of the first funnel. It housed the captain´s bridge and the radio room.

Dreadnought was launched and put into service in 1906, but it did not play a significant role in World War I. Although HMS Dreadnought was designed by the British Navy to deter the Germans, the ship only managed to intensify the already existing naval arms race. It was withdrawn from service in 1919 and scrapped in 1923.

Related items

Aurora cruiser ship (1900)

The name of the Russian armoured cruiser became well known during the October Revolution of 1917.

British soldier (World War I)

During World War I, Britain was part of the military alliance called the ´Triple Entente´.

Oil tanker

Oil tankers appeared in the late 19th century; today they are among the largest ships.

SM U-35 submarine (Germany, 1912)

Submarines had an important role in naval warfare as early as World War I.

Tanks (World War I)

Tanks developed in the mid-1910s quickly became the most important weapons of land-based military operations.

Weapons (World War I)

World War I brought major changes in military technology, due to the development of new weapons.

Lake steamer (1846)

The first paddle steamer in Hungary entered service in 1846.

North River Steamboat (Clermont) (1807)

Robert Fulton American engineer created the first operational steam-powered ship.

Titanic (1912)

RMS Titanic was the largest passenger ship at the beginning of the 20th century.

USS Missouri (US, 1944)

The battleship USS Missouri, first deployed during WWII was also deployed in the Gulf War.

USS Tarawa LHA-1 (1976)

From the 1940s, the increasingly large aircraft carriers became the masters of the oceans.

Container ships

Commercial maritime routes of container ships form a global network.

English battleship (18th century)

English sailing ships were among the best ships in the 17th-19th centuries.

French soldier (World War I)

During World War I France was part of the military alliance called ´Triple Entente´.

German soldier (World War I)

German sordiers in the First World War were well trained and used modern weapons.

Hovercraft, SR.N4 Mk.III

Hovercraft are capable of travelling at high speed above the surface of water.

Quinquereme (3rd century BC)

The warship having several rows of oars was the typical warship of the Hellenistic era.

RMS Queen Mary 2 (2003)

The largest ocean liner at the time of its construction.

USS Ohio (US, 1979)

Nuclear propulsion was first used by the US Navy for powering submarines in the mid-20th century.

Added to your cart.