Ancient Egyptian house

Ancient Egyptian house

An average Egyptian dwelling consisted of regularly arranged rooms.

History

Keywords

dwelling, Egypt, settlement, alley, Nile, Gift of the Nile, house, building structure, lifestyle, North Africa, settlement structure, agriculture, irrigation agriculture, desert, roof terrace, history of lifestyles, antiquity, history

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Questions

  • What was the most common building material of Egyptian houses?
  • Why were Egyptian houses built tightly next to each other, sunk in the sand?
  • Is it true that the majority of Egyptian houses were single storey houses?
  • Is it true that rooms were not organised within the houses?
  • What type of 'room' was usually not part of Egyptian houses?
  • What was the shape of windows and doorways in Egyptian houses?
  • What was not found in ancient Egyptian dwellings?
  • What was the furniture of an average Egyptian dwelling made of?
  • What was the name of pots used for storing crops?
  • What was NOT stored in an ancient Egyptian pantry?
  • What was NOT stored in an ancient Egyptian pantry?
  • Which of these foods was possible to be found in an ancient Egyptian pantry?
  • Which of these foods was possible to be found in an ancient Egyptian pantry?
  • Which river was ancient Egypt the 'gift' of?
  • Which continent was ancient Egypt located on?
  • What was the main task of women in ancient Egypt?
  • What 'profession' could an ancient Egyptian woman NOT have?
  • What was the main material of ancient Egyptian clothes?
  • What is NOT true for the climate of ancient Egypt?
  • Which was the most important room in an ancient Egyptian house?
  • Which furniture was not known to ancient Egyptians?
  • How many times a day did ancient Egyptians eat?
  • What did ancient Egyptians use for skin care?
  • Which instrument was not known in ancient Egypt?
  • What sport did ancient Egyptians not do?
  • What did Egyptians use to sweeten their food?
  • What was the most common material of the floor of Egyptian houses?

Scenes

Ancient Egyptian settlement

  • Nile - One of the longest rivers in the world. It was called 'Hapi' in Ancient Egyptian language.
  • fields - When the Nile flooded, it deposited a layer of fertile mud on the surrounding lands. This is why ancient Egyptian name of the country was 'Kemet', meaning 'black land'.
  • settlement - Settlements were usually built on infertile areas, often on elevated spots further away from the river. Houses were usually arranged in a rectangular pattern.
  • desert - Apart from the fertile lands near the Nile, almost all the territory of Ancient Egypt was infertile desert area. This was referred to as 'Deshret', meaning 'red land'.

Ancient Egyptian dwellings

Ancient Egyptian dwellings were mostly built of adobe bricks and bricks made of mud of the Nile. These could not resist weather conditions and were lost to posterity.

Fortunately, archaeologists have found some model houses in tombs from the age of the Middle Kingdom. These, together with the written sources give us information about the shape, structure and equipment of dwellings.

Houses were sunk in the sand and were built tightly together (because of the climate and local weather conditions). The narrow streets, alleys were covered with roofs, and a wall around the settlement was also protecting it from the sand. Buildings were mostly single storey, but models indicate that there were also two-storey houses, with stairs leading to the roof terrace or balcony.

Houses

Dwelling

Interior structure

  • entrance
  • hall
  • window - Because of the heat and sand, there were only small windows which provided the room with light.
  • bedroom
  • servants' room
  • workshop - Craftsmen in ancient Egypt had great expertise in pottery, weaving, and carpentry.
  • storage
  • shade - There were often additional rooms on this area.
  • flat roof
  • stairs
  • roof terrace
  • column

The structure of dwellings

Dwellings were complexes of regularly arranged rooms. The three most common types of houses consisted of three living rooms, one kitchen and one pantry. Some buildings also had a basement, used as a pantry. The ceiling of the main room was often supported by wooden columns.

A flight of stairs led to the basement or to the roof terrace (if there was one). Doorways and windows were simple rectangular openings, windows were not glazed.

Animation

Structure of the settlement

  • gate
  • wall
  • dwelling
  • fountain
  • bricks
  • shades
  • street

Walk

Narration

Ancient Egyptians adapted the layout and design of their dwellings to suit the natural surroundings and weather conditions. Houses were built tightly together and sunk in the sand. The narrow streets and alleys were covered with roofs, and a wall around the settlements protected them from the sun and the sand.

Buildings, constructed from adobe bricks and the mud of the Nile, were usually single storey houses, but there were also two-storey houses.

Dwellings were complexes of regularly arranged rooms. The most common type of houses consisted of three living rooms, one kitchen and one pantry. Some buildings also included a basement, used as a pantry. Stairs were built to access the roof or the basement. Doors and windows were just rectangular openings.

Furniture was relatively simple. The Egyptians' furniture and household equipment was designed to be functional, they commonly used beds, chairs, tables and 'wardrobes'. Furniture was almost always made of wood. Staples (cereals, oil, etc.) were usually stored in amphorae. Homes were colourful. There were often shelves on the walls, carved in the wall or made of wood.

Ancient Egyptian houses could not resist weather conditions and were lost to posterity. Fortunately, archaeologists have found some model houses in tombs from the age of the Middle Kingdom. These, together with written sources, offer us information about the shape, structure and equipment of these dwellings.

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